slythwolf: Some unlucky soul has an incomplete Pai Sho set. (Default)
Kids. No. Okay? Just--no.

"Illicit" is an adjective meaning not morally or legally permissible. The verb you want that sounds like it is "elicit".

PLZ LEARN THE DIFFERENCE KTHX.
slythwolf: Some unlucky soul has an incomplete Pai Sho set. (Default)
This is not the first time I have been forced to cover this topic. Please, English-speaking people of the world, take note and cut this shit out.

Words like "gingerly", "leisurely", and the most recent offender, "stately", are not adverbs. They are adjectives. You can say something is "stately", but not that someone walks "stately". Might as well say zie walks "fast"--oh, wait, okay, people already do that, don't they? Cut it out, America, it's "quickly".

Look. It's like "gentlemanly", okay? Or even just "manly". We all know those are adjectives. (Now that I have said this, I'm sure someone somewhere is gleefully posting to the internet the phrase "walked manly down the street". FMLanguage.) Stop pretending they are the only ones that fit the form. "Only", there's another one. There are a metric fuckton* of adjectives that end in "ly". It is not a giant sign saying "THIS IS AN ADVERB; ADVERB AHOY".

Cut the shit out. I mean it.

*Still a technical term.
slythwolf: Some unlucky soul has an incomplete Pai Sho set. (Default)
"Conscious" and "conscience" are two different words with two completely different meanings.

No, srsly. Open your dictionary.
slythwolf: Some unlucky soul has an incomplete Pai Sho set. (Default)
The breed of horse is Arabian. Arabic is the language.

Dear Fandom

Jul. 1st, 2009 10:17 am
slythwolf: Some unlucky soul has an incomplete Pai Sho set. (Default)
If you're going to make up a name for a character, try to make sure it's not a word that already exists. I can't help picturing "Lady Angora" with very fluffy fur, a pink twitching nose, and long ears.
slythwolf: Some unlucky soul has an incomplete Pai Sho set. (Default)
Please stop conflating alliteration with tongue-twisters. That's right, I'm talking to you, Dairy Queen mouth.
slythwolf: Some unlucky soul has an incomplete Pai Sho set. (Default)
Linen starts out stiff and gets softer with washing and wear.

A Thought

Jun. 16th, 2009 11:42 pm
slythwolf: Some unlucky soul has an incomplete Pai Sho set. (Default)
If you're so drunk that you can't tell whether your beer is cold by picking it up, you don't need another one.
slythwolf: Some unlucky soul has an incomplete Pai Sho set. (Default)
As an addendum to the previous post: Do not tell poor people they're wrong about any of the following.

- which foods are the cheapest in their area
- which foods they can afford
- that prepackaged foods are more expensive than cooking from scratch (because they're not, if you buy the super cheap stuff that's barely food at all, which is what you have to do when you're poor)
- what they "should" be eating (unless you are prepared to buy it for them)

You know what? I eat meat when I can get it. I eat cheese, I drink milk, I eat eggs. I knit with wool and even--gasp!--silk. And I'll keep on doing all of it. I fucking dare you to stop me.
slythwolf: Some unlucky soul has an incomplete Pai Sho set. (Default)
Dear English-speaking unwashed masses,

Please cease and desist all use of the appalling construction "based off". Something can only be "based on" something else.

No love,
Wolf A. Woman, Slytherin

Dear World

May. 14th, 2009 06:17 pm
slythwolf: Some unlucky soul has an incomplete Pai Sho set. (Default)
Please stop trying to pretend "effete" is a synonym for "effeminate". Please. I know you think that since they start with the same four letters, they must mean the same thing. I don't know why you think that, but it's fairly clear that you do. Please stop pretending that A) these are the same word and B) the shorter one is more "obscure" or something and therefore you can use it to call people "effeminate" without seeming like that's what you're doing. It's completely transparent to everybody.

But the thing is, what "effete" actually means is "exhausted" (as in tired, worn out, no energy) or "sterile" (as in unable to produce offspring). It actually means something that has nothing to do with what you think it means. This is the case with so many "big"* words that I think most of you should stop trying to use them.

* Big, heh, right. "Effete" has two syllables and is not the smallest word I've heard referred to as "big". You know what, maybe y'all should stop trying to use the little words as well, since you seem to think "big" means "unusual", "academic", "lofty", "obscure" or "difficult to understand".

Dear World

May. 5th, 2009 06:16 am
slythwolf: Some unlucky soul has an incomplete Pai Sho set. (Default)
There are other punctuation marks than the ellipsis...No really...I promise...You don't have to use those same three dots every time you want to punctuate something...In fact...it gets pretty annoying...
slythwolf: Some unlucky soul has an incomplete Pai Sho set. (Default)
Strait-laced. Straitjacket. It means "tight". There is no "gh" in it.

PSA

Dec. 7th, 2008 02:23 pm
slythwolf: Some unlucky soul has an incomplete Pai Sho set. (Default)
"Look to" does not mean "look at".

In fact, unless a spatial direction follows the phrase (as in Gandalf's "look to the East"), "look to" means to rely on someone for something ("she looks to me for comfort"), or to be beholden to someone or in their charge in some way ("while you're apprenticed here, you'll look to Master Jerint").

All of which is by way of saying that while you can look at, peer at, glance at, squint at, cast your gaze upon or even (though I wouldn't recommend it) turn your wide, sparkling sapphire orbs toward "the trees surrounding the camp", you sure as hell cannot look to them.

Unless the trees somehow owe you a poker debt and you're looking to them for repayment--and that's a fic I would read.

This message has been brought to you by the Wolf A. Woman Foundation for the Promotion of Correct Grammar and Usage. Now you know--and knowing is half the battle.
slythwolf: Some unlucky soul has an incomplete Pai Sho set. (Default)
I love Britishisms. I love them, and I use them in my own writing and even in my speech on occasion. But you know who doesn't use Britishisms? Buffy Summers, Willow Rosenberg and Xander Harris. If you are a British fan and you write Buffy fic, please, for the love of little apples, get an American beta. We don't promise to turn up places, we promise to show up or to be there. We don't tell people they're winding us up; we say "Stop messing with me." And after Angel loses his soul in season 2, Buffy will not think to herself that Angel has gone. She will think that he is gone. I have had to stop reading five otherwise decent-seeming fics within the first three paragraphs tonight alone. Please, please, please stop it.

In a related story I now fully understand how Brits who read American Harry Potter fic feel.
slythwolf: Some unlucky soul has an incomplete Pai Sho set. (Default)
I know that in some instances "lead" is pronounced the same as "led". However, when that is the case, "lead" means the element and not the past tense of the verb "lead". The past tense of the verb "lead" is spelled "led".

I used to do this myself until I realized that I knew "led" was a real word and if "lead" was its own past tense there would be no reason for "led" to exist.

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